Archive for category brush

Chikuhodo Z-8 Cheek Brush +

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I’m so excited to discuss one of my recent acquisitions…

For some time I use a mix of makeup brushes, from MAC to Shu and Le Metier de Beaute’s. Overall I am happy with what I do have, but I’ve been wanting to streamline what I use. Anyway, long story short, I’ve been on a hunt for a brush to use highlighters and blush. I do currently own a couple of Shu Uemura blush brushes, but I wanted something a little different. Eventually I do plan on phasing out my MAC ones and random other brands and ultimately just keeping it Japanese with brushes (with an exception of a couple).

When it comes to makeup brushes, there’s no question that the Japanese make the best ones out there. Some are familiar with Shu Uemuras, others use Hakuodo, RMK, and of course the infamous luxury Suqqu brushes. You get the idea, the Japanese are known for using the finest hair, the ultimate craftsmanship and exquisite design. 
To those of you who are a bit unfamiliar with Chikuhodo, they’re the manufacturers of the best brushes out there. Of course, being an amazing line of brushes, I’ve always wanted one. but since they’re from Japan…that means I can’t easily buy one. *cries* 

Until now !! Thank you to a fellow friend who gave me the most amazing opportunity to get one of these bad girls.  I now own a Chikuhodo Z-8 *cue in the skies parting and angels singing and rainbows shining with flying unicorns*

Onto the review!!!

Hair: it’s made from 100% grey squirrel hair. Can I just say this is the softest brush I’ve ever touched? It’s not just soft, it’s orgasmic-inducing soft. What I’ve noticed about this specific hair is that it comes to a very fine point. It’s so excellent and appropriate because it’s a tapered brush. So even though the brush itself is tapered, the hairs itself are tapered. 

Density: It’s definitely a dense brush, not dense as a powder brush, but it’s one of the denser blush brushes I’ve come across. You’ll see what I mean. The brush itself is a lot lighter in my hands than how it appears. Yes, it’s light, but it doesn’t feel flimsy.

Ferrule and handle: it’s black, long and it’s very sturdy. What makes this stand out is that a lot of mid-end brushes or even lower end ones, the ferrule is always flimsy to me. I’m always that person in Sephora touching brushes and the ferrule just comes off. (no, i’m not kidding).The handle itself is black lacquered (wood).

Why is this so amazing?: For those who have super pigmented blushes, it’s so easy to just dab this in and apply it on your cheeks without looking like you’ve been sunburned. Since it’s tapered, it’s great for those who want a really soft contour on the hollows of the cheeks. if you own a really dark powder bronzer who can just use a light hand, this is the kind of brush that will fit the bill. Blending is such a breeze with this brush. It’s literally applying and blending at the same time. Due to the softness of the brush, sometimes with non pigmented blushes I have to pick up a bit more product to apply on my face. At the same time, non pigmented blushes are hard to get a hold of anyway. Plus owning something that’s so hard to come by just makes this gem so much more rewarding.

There’s always the benefit of owning a brush that’s luxurious just as it is well designed. Even holding it in my hands, it’s truly holding a true piece of art. I finally feel like I own a unicorn 😀

Total price: $154. (price which is approx: $117 + tax + shipping + fees).



Z-8 in all it’s glory













oops, there’s a bit of dust on it. thx, mr. fan. meep. >;[





From left to right:


Shu Goat 18


Shu 20H


Shu 17


Chikuhodo Z-8



Left to right:


Shu goat 18


Chikuhodo Z-8





The brochure that came with my package.

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Le Metier de Beaute Kabuki Brush +

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I was in the city and I stopped on over to Bergdorf Goodman to say hi to Dustin. So I’m there, as usual playing with the kabuki in my hands. I’m an addict to very soft brushes and it’s no help that he’s used it on my face in every single makeover he’s done on me. I probably looked like a crazy woman touching it all the time, yet I never got the brush. I was that crazy customer who tested blushes with the brush. Yea, I’m a creeper.
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I have and use Edward Bess Daydream bronzer, but I use it as a contour with my Shu Pony 20H brush. I never really used powder bronzer all over my face, and a big reason is that I don’t have the proper brush. A few months back I bought Le Metier Romeo and Juliet bronzing duet and I haven’t really played with the bronzer side, because it’s a bronzer that I can use all over. Dustin uses this duo on me, but he has always uses the kabuki brush. I thought to myself, “man, $85…I wonder if I can find something for less because $85…”

So the hunt for a kabuki began…and here’s what I’ve tested:

Too Faced: I really like this one as well and it’s travel friendly. For those who are a bit on a lower budget, this is a nice option.
Edward Bess: I’ve touched it a few times, and it has never caught my attention as a dense or exquisitely soft brush.
NARS Ita Kabuki: ok this brush is way too scratchy and wide for me. The shape isn’t designed for my personal use.
NARS blush brush: this is shaped kinda like a kabuki, but it wasn’t dense enough for my liking, which makes sense because it’s a blush brush. It wasn’t that soft either, even though it’s made out of pony hair.
Shu Uemura doesn’t make one (or not one that I know of), but I’m sure if they did, it would be full of awesome.
I don’t think Suqqu makes a kabuki either, but I do want their face brush. Eventually I’ll make the investment.

I waited, thinking that I can find a substitute. But nah. So I’ve used it a few times already testing it out with different blushes and with crème formulas too. It’s neat because it’s so small that you can take it with you in your purse, but it seriously packs a punch (in terms of the hair density). What I adore about it is that it’s sooooo soft. mmmm.

Hair: pony and goat. The hairs are trimmed off the animal and the hairs go through a three-day conditioning process. No wonder why they are so soft 😀

Usage: I use it on my forehead, temples, neck and sides of my face when it comes to bronzer. I use light, circular motions and the product goes on really evenly. I’ve tested it twice when it comes to cream blushes (By Terrys VIP Bronze Expert blush). I dislike the brush applicator, so I just do a pump, slide the product on my face and every so slightly buff it in with the kabuki. It’s actually more of a stippling action, but you get the idea.

Price: $85, and it’s worth every penny because it’s such a dense, yet such a soft and the application is effortless. 

Onto the photos ! 



 Left to Right:

Sonia Kashuk Synthetic Flat Blusher Brush

Le Metier de Beaute Kabuki


 Left to Right:



Le Metier de Beaute Kabuki

Sonia Kashuk Synthetic Flat Blusher Brush


Top to bottom:

Le Metier de Beaute Kabuki

Sonia Kashuk Synthetic Flat Blusher Brush




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Le Metier de Beaute Eye Crease brush #1

So I guess today is brush day in the life and times of my blog :p
As you all know I love Le Metier de Beaute, but one area that I haven’t really discussed are their makeup brushes. One interesting feature about them is that they’re short. I personally like short brushes since they’re easier to carry with you when you travel. My eye crease brush comes with a velvet pouch which makes it really nice to carry with you whether it’s in your purse or luggage and it helps prevent it from fraying or it gets squashed if it sits in your bag. 
Ok so onto the shape: it’s tapered, dome like shape. The bristles are soft, but it maintains its shape really well. I tend to use this brush more often just because of its size. I do love my Shu #10, but it’s a long brush and not the most travel friendly. It reminds me of a nice size in between the MAC 217 and the MAC 219.  I’ve used the 217 for quite some time and it’s a great brush, but it’s slightly too floppy for my personal taste. I love the 219 for smudging and a defined crease, but it can be too defined of a crease at times. I feel like Goldilocks when it comes to this, it’s too fluffy (217), it’s not fluffy enough (219). I need that brush that’s a nice in between.
Bristles and price: Pony and Goat hair. It’s $45. 
Onto the pretty photos:
Left to right:
MAC 224
MAC 219
Le Metier de Beaute Eye Crease Brush
MAC 217
Left to right:
MAC 224
MAC 219
Le Metier de Beaute Eye Crease Brush
MAC 217
Left to right:
Le Metier  de Beaute Eye Crease Brush
MAC 217
To be fair, I’ve had this 217 for quite some time and I need to clean it. I do like the brush, but it’s so much easier for me to blend with the Le Metier de Beaute one. See how it’s shape is a nice in between the 219 and 217? I love the tapering of this brush. I own a lot of crease brushes (From MAC to Laura Mercier and Shu Uemura), but this one is my favorite one out of the bunch.

Is it worth buying: I think so, even if it’s just for portable purposes, but I do think this one is great for blending, especially if you’re like me and suck at it and tried many brushes and still suck. This brush makes it easier to blend and finally, a brush I can do a few quick strokes and I’m out the door.

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Shu Uemura natural brush #10

There have been questions in relation to this post (the last long paragraph) since not many people know too much about certain Shu Uemura brushes. To the makeup aficionado, Shu Uemura is definitely without a doubt makes amazing brushes. I know all of us either dream of having some of the kolinsky brushes (I am a part of this group). Anyway, this brush does deserve its own post. 
Size and price: The height is taller than most makeup brushes. Sadly for me, I don’t own a ruler, but I did take photos so you can see how it compares to other brushes that others may own. The handle is quite slender and the price is $68. 
Bristles: It’s half kolinsky, half sable brush.
Why this is such a great brush:
My makeup artist who works for Giorgio Armani used this brush for my makeover because I asked him what makes this brush so great. He used a very little amount of eyeshadow. He used the side (not the tip) of the brush to apply the eyeshadow. He blended the eyeshadows in small circular (almost small oval like) motions with the tip of the brush. He then wiped off the brush and used a very small amount of highlighter on the browbone. He applied a lot less eyeshadow product than what I normally do, which was surprising. When he was finished using one color and wanted to go onto the next color, he wiped off the eyeshadow on a tissue and all the color came off with a quick stroke. 
During the makeover I didn’t think he was blending the eyeshadow because he barely moved his wrist/arm. Trust me, the results you get with this brush is phenomenal. 
Here’s some pictures for comparison: 
From left to right: 
MAC 252
Shu natural brush #10
MAC 242

From left to right:

MAC 252
Shu natural brush #10
MAC 242
the big thing to take away from this photo is see how tapered the #10 is? slight taper which makes it nice for blending.
I hardly use the 252 because its too big for my eyelids. I’ve used it less than 10 times. This is a lovely brush for those who have a lot of lid space. 
Since the Shu 10 & MAC 252 seem somewhat similar: 


Top to bottom: 
Shu natural brush #10
MAC 252.
I know we all love our MAC brushes, but you can see where the 252 is already splaying. I’ve washed the 252 once (I really only have used this less than 10 times). I’ve washed the Shu #10 once as well. See the difference in how the Shu #10 keeps its shape?
Need I say more? People ask as to why you shell out more for a makeup brush…well here’s a good indication.
Is it worth buying?: Do you even need to ask? 🙂

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